Kingdom

Hawaii judge stops Trump travel ban before it starts

Trump vows to fight ruling all the way to the Supreme Court, calling it ‘judicial overreach’

Image Credit: AFP

US President Donald Trump gestures as he speaks at former president Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage in Nashville, Tennessee on March 15, 2017.

Nashville: US President Donald Trump vowed Wednesday to fight a federal court ruling halting his revised temporary ban of refugees and nationals from six Muslim-majority countries, describing the decision as “judicial overreach.”

“The law in the constitution gave the president the power to suspend immigration when he deems it to be in the national interest of our country,” he said at a rally in Nashville, Tennessee, following the decision by the Hawaii court.

He told the cheering crowd that his administration would “take our case as far as it needs to go, including all the way up to the Supreme Court. We are going to win.”

A federal judge in Hawaii halted Trump’s revised ban Wednesday, hours before it was due to take effect, court documents showed.

US District Judge Derrick Watson ruled that the state of Hawaii, in its legal challenge to Trump’s executive order, had established a strong likelihood that the ban would cause “irreparable injury” if it were to go ahead.

The court in Honolulu was the first to rule on a trio of legal challenges against the ban, which targets all refugees and people from six mainly Muslim countries. Decisions were expected later Wednesday from federal courts in Washington state and Maryland.

But the ruling means a nationwide freeze on enforcement of section two of the order, banning entry by nationals of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for 90 days.

It also halts section six, suspending the US refugee admissions program for 120 days.

“The court declines to stay this ruling or hold it in abeyance should an emergency appeal of this order be filed,” the ruling said.

Trump’s administration says the travel ban is necessary to keep extremists from entering the United States.